CURING DELAY
 NO ONE SHOULD DIE WAITING FOR HEALTH CARE. MUSO EXISTS TO CURE THE INJUSTICE OF DELAY.
 
YEAR AT A GLANCE
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Ari Johnson

CEO, Muso

Dear friends,

The COVID-19 pandemic has revealed a plague that has been hidden from us: the plague of delay. Muso exists to cure delay. As members of a global movement of providers, policymakers, and citizens working to stop the spread of COVID-19 over the past year, we know that late access is not accidental. Health care systems, in Mali and around the world, drive late diagnosis and treatment by the very way they are designed. How long each of us suffers, how long we wait for care, should not depend on where we were born, on the color of our skin, on how much cash we can muster on hand. But it does.

To stop COVID-19, we must cure delay. Delays in testing, delays in care, delays in supported isolation —these delays have fueled the rapid spread of COVID-19 around the globe. Late care for COVID-19 endangers patients, because the coronavirus can cause respiratory failure that can progress rapidly, within hours. Each hour without diagnosis, isolation, and care also provides more opportunities for the virus to spread. It is through delay that an outbreak became a pandemic.

To pursue this global cure for delay, to stop moving from one crisis response to the next, we need to transform broken health care programs into just, equitable health care systems. In Mali and Côte d’Ivoire, where Muso works, children once threatened by the spread of Ebola remain at risk of dying from other treatable diseases like malaria, diarrheal disease, and pneumonia. Elders living in poverty who are not able to quarantine after a COVID-19 diagnosis are equally threatened by the user fees that limit their access to routine health care. COVID-19 has laid bare our interconnectedness, and shown that none of us are safe until all of us get the care we need, when we need it.

At Muso, we have remained focused over the past year on what we do best: caring for patients with exceptional speed. Together with our government partners in Mali, in 2020 we established a COVID-19 response intended to address the urgent crisis of the pandemic, while building health systems back stronger.

We will see the end of this COVID-19 pandemic in our lifetimes. In some parts of the world, the end is already in sight. So let us dream bigger. This crisis has laid bare the brokenness of our health systems, but it has also shown us what a cure looks like. By caring about our neighbors, next door and across an ocean, like we’ve cared for each other over this past year, we can design an end to unjust delay. We can build health systems that meet patients where they live, with the care they need, on time. We’ve already begun.

 

In solidarity, 

 

THE UNJUST TIME BETWEEN WHEN SOMEONE NEEDS HEALTH CARE AND WHEN THEY RECEIVE CARE

MUSO'S 2020 PRIORITIES

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Nurses from Yirimadio CSCOM
CHW's backpack are filled with PPE
Muso supports clinicians to implement covid curricula
PPE stocks for CHW contain goggles, masks, gloves, face shields and hand sanitizer
6 months of PPE arrived for our staff since the 1st cases of covid
Oxygen is now accessible from the moto ambulance to health facilities
Haute couture masks

Care for all our patients, without delay or interruption.

CARE 

Conduct research to change the global standard of care.

RESEARCH

Accelerate our government partners' national health impact through technical assistance.

ACCELERATE

 

TO PROVIDE EVIDENCE-BASED APPROACHES SUPPORTING WELL-BEING,

A MORAL COMMITMENT TO HEALING IN ACTION

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AISSATA ABDOU COULIBALY
WE ARE THE ONES WHO SAVE THE PEOPLE. WE SEE HOW WE CAN HELP THEM. I REALLY WANT TO PROTECT PEOPLE FROM THIS ILLNESS.

When COVID-19 arrived in Mali, Community Health Workers (CHWs) like  Aissata Abdou Coulibaly  became the front line of defense against the virus in Malian communities overnight. Muso protected and trained CHWs across our nine Malian sites to continue care without delay or interruption during the pandemic.

 

LEARNINGS PRODUCED THROUGH RESEARCH; A TOOL OF JUSTICE WHICH HOLDS US

ACCOUNTABLE AND DRIVES CHANGE OF POLICY AND PRACTICE

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SAVING LIVES BY DESIGN

Our commitment to ending child deaths is not theoretical. It is as real as the life of four-year-old Yacouba. During a routine home visit, Yacouba's CHW observed a danger sign, and immediately accompanied him and his parents to the nearby health center where he was diagnosed with severe malaria. His care was escalated to a hospital for life saving treatment including a blood transfusion. Muso’s proactive approach allowed for rapid care, as Yacouba’s CHW identified urgent warning signs and accessed care in time to save his life.

YACOUBA